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>Israel Faxx
>JN Nov. 12, 1997, Vol. 5, No. 208

Holocaust Memorial Vandalized in Germany

The European memorial to the Holocaust genocide against Jews was vandalized with yellow paint thrown by unknown assailants, police said. The damage was discovered Sunday as people arrived for a ceremony on the 59th anniversary of "Kristallnacht", when the Nazis burned synagogues and Jewish businesses throughout Germany on Nov. 9, 1938. Police said the damage at the site in Landsberg-am-Lech, in Bavaria in southern Germany, occurred overnight Saturday.


IDF Preparing from Non-Conventional Air Attack

By IINS News Service

The IDF is preparing for the possibility that Iraq might try an aerial attack against Israel, using non-conventional weaponry such as chemical or biological warfare.

The Air Force units charged with preventing an aerial attack have been alerted since the 1991 Gulf War and are on the alert for a drone aircraft that might try to enter into Israel's airspace with non-conventional weaponry on board.

The London Times reported that Iraq is developing a secret project, which entails a pilotless aircraft that would be dispatched to spray chemical or biological agents over Israel. The unit is operated by a long-distance remote control unit. The "Weapon of the Day of Judgement" is being designed by engineers in Iraq to replace the surface-to-surface missiles used in the Gulf War.

The Iraqis took an M-18 plane and are equipping it for a 540-mile flight. Although the plane would be limited to several tens of kilograms of weaponry, due to fuel needs for the flight, experts have already stated auxiliary fuel tanks could be added to permit a larger cargo of a non-conventional substance. Experts estimate the plane could make it to Israel in about two hours.

The M-18 pilotless plane is also capable of flying at very low altitudes, and this increases Israeli fears of it not being detected by radar systems.


Kissinger States a Palestinian State is Unavoidable

By IINS News Service

Speaking in Tel-Aviv's Habimah Theatre, former United States Secretary of State Henry Kissinger stated the world's recognition of a Palestinian State is a certainty. Therefore, the issue is not if there will be a state, but rather what will be its borders. This Kissinger stated must be discussed during the negotiations.

Kissinger, who is visiting Israel to attend memorial services this week for Yitzchak Rabin, is a guest of the Peres Peace Center. Kissinger stated that today, unlike the 1970s, the steps taken towards peace must be significantly larger. He added, "If you do not know the destination, you cannot get there and each step, each concession, becomes harder."

Kissinger stated he told former Prime Minister Menachem Begin that once autonomy was granted, the Palestinian state would follow in a matter of time. He added that it was a certainty that Israel would never return to the pre-June 1967 borders, so he favored something along the lines of the Allon Plan.

The Allon Plan called for Israel to retain areas of Jerusalem liberated in the June 1967 Six Day War, portions of Judea and Samaria and the Jordan Valley.


Soviet Jewish Archives Planned

By Larry Freund (VOA-New York)

It was announced in New York Tuesday that the former ambassador to the United Nations in Geneva, Morris Abram, is leading a project to document the international movement on behalf of Soviet Jews.

The archival project, according to its organizers, will document the Soviet repression of Jews' religious rights and the development of an international advocacy movement on their behalf.

Abram, who once headed the National Conference on Soviet Jewry, called the campaign for Soviet Jews one of the great movements in terms of human rights. He is chairing the archival project's advisory board and told reporters the objectives of the movement on behalf of Soviet Jews were substantially attained with the emigration of more than 1 million Jews from the former USSR.

He said the movement also contributed to what he called the downfall of one of the worst totalitarian movements in the history of the world. "And it did it without war. Hitler had to be destroyed by a terrible war. The Soviet Union self-destructed."

Abram added that he had no doubt that the years of repression in the Soviet Union made it ripe for change. The documentation of the movement on behalf of Soviet Jews, he said, will allow people to reproduce some of the accomplishments of that movement for people throughout the world who still suffer.

The International Soviet Jewry Archival Project -- a seven-year, $6 million effort -- is based at the University of Colorado at Boulder. It is part of a broader program at the university to collect the records of various human rights groups, including Amnesty International USA and Physicians for Human Rights.


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