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  Israel Faxx                                      \/ /  \/ /
  August 2, 1994 Volume 2, #142                    / /\__/_/\
  Electronic World Communications, Inc.           /__\ \_____\
  8916 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45215             \  /
  Internet: ewcnews@tso.uc.edu Phone: (513) 563-7424   \/
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In South Florida, Tony Martin got a surprise while fishing. He reeled in something heavy; a pillowcase containing valuables. There were credit cards, gold jewelry and watches inside. Police say whoever placed them there had stolen them. So the only thing Tony Martin got to take home from his catch was a great story to tell.

Terrorism Expert Predicts Future

By Paul Wolfson (Congress)

Congress held a hearing on terrorism Monday, and heard a stern warning from an American expert in the field. The recent bomb attacks on Jewish and Israeli targets in Buenos Aires and London have been described by some observers as attempts to derail the Middle East peace process. But Steven Emerson, the author of several books on terrorism, sees these incidents in a very different light.

"The bombings are part of an escalating worldwide battle between radical Islamic militants and the West. The perpetrators of these bombings are not motivated by what we know as 'legitimate grievances.'"

Emerson contends that in the 1970s, most Middle East terrorism could be linked directly to the Arab-Israeli dispute. But he insists today's acts of terror are different and broader based. "Radical Islamic militants see the very existence of pro-Western nations, such as Israel and Egypt, or pluralistic systems such as democracy, or rival religions such as Judaism and Christianity or even moderate Muslims, as a mortal threat to their own being. These militants see the continuation of a thousand year conspiracy waged by the infidel to subjugate Islam."

And so the great enemy of radical Islam, suggests Emerson, is not Israel, it is the United States and America's allies. And he warns terrorists are likely to turn their attention more and more to Western targets -- such as the World Trade Center in New York City. "The fact remains that radical Islamic leaders see the west as part of a major conspiracy to wipe out Islam. In this context, Israel is the little Satan and the US is the great Satan. Attacks on targets like the World Trade Center last year or in Buenos Aires two weeks ago are justified -- even mandated -- as part of the holy war against the infidels."

Arafat Wants a Say in Jerusalem's Future

By Art Chimes (Jerusalem)

Palestinian Leader Yasir Arafat says he wants to speed up negotiations on Jerusalem. The declaration comes a week after Israel agreed to recognize Jordan's special role concerning Muslim holy sites in Jerusalem.

Arafat told reporters in the Gaza Strip that negotiations over the holy sites in Jerusalem can not be separated from political and other issues.

Referring to Israel's acknowledgment of at least partial Jordanian jurisdiction over Muslim holy sites, Arafat said that if Israel has started to negotiate on Jerusalem, the Palestinians insist they must be included. Palestinian leaders claim sovereignty over Arab East Jerusalem, which they want to be the capital of a future Palestinian state.

Their claim includes the city's Muslim holy sites, and even partial Jordanian authority would conflict with the Palestinian position.

Jordan controls the Islamic trust that administers Al-Aqsa mosque and the other Muslim holy sites in Jerusalem. Israel and the PLO agreed to defer discussion of Jerusalem until later in the peace process, but there is nothing in their agreement to prevent them from accelerating the negotiations.

Jerusalem the Holy

By Art Chimes (Jerusalem)

It's hard to avoid religion in Jerusalem. For Christians, it's the site of the central event of their faith, the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus. For Muslims, it's where the prophet Mohammed ascended to heaven on his night journey. Jews revere the city as the location of their ancient temples, and of the Western Wall, the last remnant of the Second Temple.

But the holiness of Jerusalem is not just in the historic and traditional events that happened here. The Jerusalem of today resonates with the echoes of its spiritual past.

You see it on the Via Dolorosa, the old city street that traces the traditional route taken by Jesus on his way to the crucifixion. Christians, often carrying full-size wooden crosses, retrace the steps of Jesus. Archbishop Samir Kafiti, the Episcopal Church's top clergyman in the Middle East, says it is part of God's design that the central events of Christianity happened in Jerusalem.

"To us, the holy land is a sacrament where pilgrimage is to be exercised. It's where the faith is nourished. And commitment to Jesus Christ becomes more and more vivid and visible after a pilgrimage to the land of Jesus. Without Jerusalem there is no Christianity. And without Christianity, Jerusalem would not have the same significance that it does in the Christian faith."

Jerusalem is often described as the third holiest site in Islam, and the call to prayer can be heard five times a day from the city's many mosques. Jerusalem's Muslim holy sites are under the jurisdiction of the Islamic Wakf. The head of the Wakf is Adnan Husseini who says the fact that God brought the prophet Mohammed to Jerusalem on his night journey to heaven is a declaration about the importance of Jerusalem, alongside the other holy cities, Mecca and Medina.
"I'll tell you that in our religion it is mentioned that if you pray in Mecca, it means each prayer is [magnified] 10,000 times. In Medina, it is 1,000 times. In Jerusalem it is 500 times. So, this means that those three mosques are having a special importance for God and for the Muslims themselves."

Jerusalem has always been a central focus of the Jewish faith. Jews everywhere pray to be "Next Year in Jerusalem." In Jerusalem's Old City, the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site, is the only surviving remnant of the Second Temple, destroyed by the Romans almost 2,000 years ago. Rabbi and philosopher David Hartman says Jerusalem symbolizes the continuity of the Jewish people, who have spent most of their history without a homeland.

"Jerusalem is the city in which you remind yourself that you (the Jewish people) are 3,000 years old. In Jerusalem, Israel lives in dialogue with its long history. Israel proclaims in Jerusalem that we are not here because of the Holocaust and we are not here because of Western guilt. We are here because we never left. We've come home. And Jerusalem is the symbol of a people who see themselves as coming home, as ending their eternal wandering."

As it has for thousands of years, Jerusalem continues to exert a profound religious and spiritual hold on the faithful. Perhaps it exerts too strong a pull, as politicians who have been trying to unravel the conundrum of Jerusalem have been finding out for years as they try to craft a way for Jews, Muslims and Christians to live, side-by-side, in this extraordinary city.


Germany Blames Local Police

By Evans Hays (Bonn)

Germany's Justice Minister, Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger, says local police are to blame for allowing neo-Nazis to go on a rampage at the Buchenwald death camp memorial last month.

The German justice minister says the attack on the Buchenwald camp could have been prevented by police. She was referring to an incident where 22 right-wing extremists went on a rampage, shouting Nazi slogans and throwing stones. One suspect is accused of threatening to burn a memorial worker to death.

Syria and Israel Both Want a 'Goodwill Gesture'

By Art Chimes (Jerusalem)

Israel and Syria have each called on the other to make goodwill gestures to help open the way to a resumption of peace talks. An Israeli government minister suggests Damascus might rein in guerrilla groups in the Israeli-controlled zone in South Lebanon as a way of showing its commitment to the peace process.

Health Minister and Reserve General Ephriam Sneh says Israel is not insisting that Damascus stop attacks by Hizbullah guerrillas in South Lebanon. But Sneh said that if Syria allows the attacks to continue, Israel might think Syrian President Hafez Assad isn't serious about making peace.

Syria's government newspaper Tishreen Monday called on Israel to make a goodwill gesture to show it is serious about resuming peace talks, one day after Israel called for a Syrian gesture.

The stalled talks revolve around the Golan Heights, which Syria wants back immediately. Israel has said it would discuss a phased withdrawal if Syria commits itself to full relations with the Jewish state.

Germany Apologizes as Warsaw Celebrates Anti-Nazi Uprising

By Jolyon Naegele (Warsaw)

Poles are marking the 50th anniversary of the Warsaw uprising against Nazi-German rule. Ceremonies commemorating the Warsaw uprising began Monday with a field mass for veterans of the underground home army.

German President Roman Herzog, British Prime Minister, John Major, US Vice President Al Gore as well as senior officials from Russia, France and other countries are in Warsaw for the uprising anniversary.

The German president apologized for Nazi Germany's brutality in Poland during the Second World War. Bowing down before the victims of the Warsaw uprising as before all the Polish victims of the Second World War, Herzog asked for forgiveness for what Germans did to Poles.

The president said understanding, trust and good neighborliness can only grow when the peoples of Germany and Poland bring what he terms the dark aspects of their recent history into the open.

The Papal Nuncio in Poland, Jozef Kowalczyk, read out a message from Pope John Paul II describing the Warsaw uprising as the beginning of the process of forming independent states in Central and Eastern Europe. The papal message went on to say that this process could only be completed after the collapse of totalitarian systems in 1989.

Monday's ceremonies were conducted in record-breaking hot weather. Dozens of nurses and scouts provided the veterans and their families with a steady supply of mineral water.

An unscheduled moment of drama at the commemoration site occurred when a huge window-shaped temporary monument to the uprising was engulfed in flames, apparently due to a fuel leak.


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